Women Warriors

Africans Unite to Save Rhinos




gualtiero boffi/Shutterstock.com

The Black Mamba Anti-Poaching Unit aims not only to protect rhinoceroses in South Africa by patrolling the Balule Nature Reserve, in Greater Kruger National Park, but to also be a role model in their communities. It’s the first majority-female, anti-poaching unit in the country.

Founded in 2013 by Transfrontier Africa NPC to protect the Olifants West Region of Balule, the Black Mambas were invited within a year to expand into other regions, and now protect all boundaries of the reserve.

These 32 young women and two men want their communities to understand that the benefits are greater through rhino conservation rather than poaching, as they address the local social and moral decay that results from poaching. Their concern is also for their children’s sake because the sham economy has corrupted morals and brought narcotics into their communities. To make a donation, visit BlackMambas.org.


This article appears in the May 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Content

Bug Apocalypse

The number of invertebrates and insects such as moths, butterflies and bees has dropped worldwide by 45 percent in the last 35 years, raising alarm about the global ecosystem.

Fish Revival

Following the removal two years ago of an obsolete dam, shad have returned to New Jersey’s Millstone River for the first time since 1845.

Horse Sense

The wild horse herds on North Carolina’s Outer Banks survived Hurricane Florence by huddling on high ground, hiding in maritime forests, and possibly by swimming.

Bat Cave Rescue

A fungus known as white-nose syndrome is decimating U.S. bat species, but scientists hope that genetic strategies and cave treatments will turn the situation around.

Mind Meld

Scientists are making progress toward using brain implants to help speech-paralyzed patients "voice" their thoughts.

Add your comment: