Tuna Turnaround

Lower Mercury Levels Tied to Drop in Coal Emissions




holbox/Shutterstock.com

Levels of highly toxic mercury contamination in Atlantic bluefin tuna are rapidly declining, a trend that has been linked to reduced mercury emissions in North America, according to a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology. Average mercury concentrations dropped by more than 2 percent per year, for a total decline of 19 percent between 2004 and 2012.

Scientists believe that most of that reduction has occurred because of a shift away from coal, the major source of mercury emissions, to natural gas and renewable fuels. Pollution control requirements imposed by the federal government have also cut mercury emissions, but these have been rolled back or eliminated by President Trump’s commitment to “bring back coal.”


Source: Scientific American


This article appears in the August 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Content

Eat Right to Sleep Well

Rather than popping a pill, eating certain foods can kick-start hormones that help us get a long, deep night’s sleep.

We Need Clean Waters

Efforts are underway around the country to make polluted waterways clean again and to instill local appreciation for their many helpful roles.

Peter Gros on Preserving Wild Nature

The wildlife expert explains why we should appreciate wolves, snakes and bats and what he finds encouraging about an enlightened focus on wildlife protection.

Running with the Kids

Families with children as young as 5 easily bond when they mindfully run together at a fun pace.

Livable Communities We Love

Across the country, cities from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh to Portland are finding fresh new ways to create engaging street life for residents while eco-upgrading their green spaces, services and infrastructure.

Add your comment: