Are Lectins the Reason You’re Not Losing Weight?



Have you tried different diets, but still have trouble losing weight or keeping it off? While other factors such as food sensitivities, environmental toxins, gut health and endocrine problems must be ruled out, for some the answer may lie in plant compounds called lectins. Lectins are a type of protein that can bind to cell membranes. Lectins are abundant in raw legumes and grains, and most commonly found in part of the seed that becomes the leaves when the plant sprouts.

In his book, The Plant Paradox: The Hidden Dangers in Healthy Foods that Cause Disease and Weight Gain, author Dr. Steven Gundry, MD explains how plant lectins can be the source of ill health, inflammation and weight gain in susceptible individuals. Individuals with compromised immune systems and poor gut health are impacted the most. For some, weight gain may be the only symptom associated with eating foods that contain lectins. However, due to the inflammatory response created in the body, conditions such as IBS, fibromyalgia, arthritis, autoimmune diseases, psoriasis/eczema, and even cancer can result. The top lectin-containing foods are legumes, all grains except millet, night shades, and most dairy products. These should be avoided for a minimum of six weeks to determine if lectins are contributing to weight or other health issues.

Dr. Brian Walsh, Chiropractic Physician and owner of CARE Natural Wellness Center, uses Nutrition Response Testing to analyze individuals to determine the underlying cause of weight and other health issues. For more information, call 321-728-1387 or visit CareWellnessFL.com.

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